Contents

If you possess a large gun safe, you’ll probably know the importance of putting lights into it. A properly illuminated gun safe is not only easy to use but can also mean the difference between success and failure in an emergency situation. Here, we will discuss the importance of installing lights in your gun safe and the aspects you must consider for it to be done properly.

Best Gun Safe Lights | Bright Guide for 2020

Best Gun Safe Lights | Bright Guide for 2020If you possess a large gun safe, you’ll probably know the importance of putting lights into it. A properly illuminated gun safe is not only easy to use but can also mean the difference between success and failure in an emergency situation. Here, we will discuss the importance of installing lights in your gun safe and the aspects you must consider for it to be done properly. We have also scoured the internet to find the best lights for gun safes on the market, and have reviewed them in detail. So you can find one easily. At a Glance: Our Top Picks for Gun Safe Lights OUR TOP PICK: BROWNING - LED Safe Lighting Kit Executive "Gun Safe Light" ing Kit w/ Motion Switch : Tactical Grade American Lights - 2,250 Total Lumens TORCHSTAR LED Safe Lighting Kit, (4) 12’’ Linkable light bars + Motion Sensor + Power adapter, Under Cabinet, Gun Safe, Locker, Closet, Under Counter, Shelf, Showcase Lighting, 5000K Daylight BEST BUDGET OPTION: Lockdown® Cordless Light Comparison of the Best "Gun Safe Lights" IMAGE PRODUCT Our Top Pick BROWNING - LED Safe Lighting Kit Super bright light with 6 LED lights per tube Includes a motion sensor power module for quick lighting in an emergency Three flexible connectors and includes all the mounting hardware required View Latest PriceRead Customer Reviews Executive Gun Safe Lighting Kit w/ Motion Switch : "Tactical Grade American" Lights - 2, "250 Total Lumens" Long LED light tubes with high illuminating power of 2250 lumens each Incluldes an automatic motion sensor to detect movement in darkness Lifetime warranty including fire & theft replacement "View Latest Price" → "Read Customer Reviews" TORCHSTAR LED Safe Lighting Kit, (4) 12’’ Linkable light bars + Motion Sensor + Power adapter, Under Cabinet, Gun Safe, Locker, Closet, Under Counter, Shelf, Showcase Lighting, 5000K Daylight Better option for a permanent gunsafe lighting solution Can be installed using adhesive tape backing or mounting screws Available in app control, manual switch, and motion-activated variants View Latest PriceRead Customer Reviews Best Budget Option Lockdown® Cordless Light Cordless design ensures you don't have to stick and connect wires Can be mounted on any surface or corner using a magnet or screws Available in sensor and non-sensor models for budget versatility View Latest PriceRead Customer Reviews Aspects to Consider When Buying Lights for your Gun Safe A gun safe light kit is a combination of several components which combine together to set up a properly illuminated container. These include bulbs, mounting accessories , a power source, sensors, and other items. Each of which plays an important part in lighting up the gun safe. Gun safes are generally kept in the garage , store room, or in any silent corner of the house where they remain concealed and protected by manual and natural elements. Some large safes are deep enough to contain a ton of firearms and ammunition. Installing lights in such gun safes make them easy to manage. Plus they offer fumble-proof access in an emergency. Light Sources: LED or CFL Bulbs? Both of these light sources are a viable option to be used for lighting up a gun safe. But each of them has their own pros and cons. To begin with, CFL bulbs are no doubt a bright source of light and consume a considerably less amount of power than incandescent lights. But these bulbs are generally big in size, which means they will occupy some space inside the safe and will need to be carefully protected when you use the safe. CFL’s are generally used to light up rooms. Plus, if your safe has a lot of racks and shelves, you’ll need one bulb for each, consuming precious storage space. A gun safe with lights can change everything ( Source ) On the other hand, LED strips are a more economical and compact alternative. They consume less power and are flexible enough to be installed in every part of the gun safe. Plus, LED lights have an 8-10 times longer lifespan than CFL bulbs. Their only drawback is that if one LED in a strip malfunctions, you’ll have to change the entire strip. Power Sources: AC or DC? ​ You can power up your gun safe lights using AC or DC power. But each of them is relevant under specific situations. AC power refers to using electricity from the home’s power supply. To use AC power, your gun safe must have an internal power outlet. You must try not to drill any holes in your gun safe to install a power outlet, as this will not only damage your safe but also reduce its capability of fire/water resistance. Moreover, you an AC power source is optimal if you open your gun safe very often (almost several times a day). Plus, if your safe has any motion sensing devices, dehumidifier , or any such accessory installed, relying on batteries is not a good idea. On the other hand, batteries are useful for lights if your gun safe does not have an inner power outlet, or there’s no power outlet near the gun safe. But bear in mind that batteries are only good if you are using switch-based lights and not motion sensors. That’s because the batteries can dry out fast when used continuously. Battery operated lights are also great for use in fireproof/waterproof gun safes. Ways to Turn Them On/Off: Switch or Motion Sensor? Many people rely upon switches to turn gun safe lights on or off, whereas others like to use technology, like motion sensors. An on/off switch allows you to control the light any way you desire. If the room is bright enough and you don’t feel the need to turn on the gun safe lights, you can keep them switched off. This helps you consume less power, especially with batteries. However, switches can be difficult to find or reach sometimes, especially in an emergency situation where you are more likely to fumble due to panic. Executive Gun Safe Lighting Kit w/ Motion Switch Motion sensors are activated once you open the door of the gun safe, or move your hand past the sensor and will turn off several seconds after. Motion sensors are great if you have your safe stored in a dark corner and you don’t want to turn a switch on or off every now and then. Motion sensors lights also help reduce power consumption. Plus, you don’t have to worry about leaving them switched on when you lock the safe. Also, keep in mind that motion sensors can give away your position when used in a dark room in an emergency. However, the risk is the same for an intruder as well. Mounting Options: Magnet, Screws or Adhesive? Gun safe lights offer different options for mounting them inside the safe. These include magnets, screws, and Velcro-based adhesives. Magnets can be used to mount lights, but they are susceptible to snagging and shifting when you move things in or out. Regardless, magnets are still a good choice to mount switches, battery packs, or motion sensors on the sides. Screws are a more sturdy option for mounting gun safe lights and ensure the lights will stay in place under all situations. Screws are also a better alternative to mount battery packs, switches, or sensors so they stay in place. TORCHSTAR LED Safe Lighting Kit But on the downside, screws require more effort to install, plus they also compromise with the construction of the safe. If your lights malfunction in the future, you’ll have to take a lot of pain to remove them and install a new set of lights. Adhesives are a more simple and effective alternative to the above two. You simply have to bring the lights into position, peel off the adhesive from their back and stick it into place. Adhesives these days are strong enough to hold the lights in place. Plus, they can be removed with ease, when required. How Many Lights Should You Install? Logically, it depends upon the size of your gun safe and the number of shelves in it. If you have a smaller gun safe with a single compartment, then a single light with an illumination of around 200 lumens will be enough. However, if you have a larger safe, you need to install multiple lights in different corners. Since shelves tend to obstruct light, you will have to analyze proper positions for mounting the lights so each and every corner of the safe is properly illuminated. If you safe has too many shelves, the best option is to use LED light strips, because they are flexible, economical, and consume less power. If your safe has a single horizontal shelf, a single bright light placed on the hinge exactly midway of the shelf partition should be enough. How Bright Should They be? The illuminating capacity of a light is measured in terms of lumens. To give you a general idea, an average 250 square feet room requires 5000 lumens of light for proper illumination. Look into the light and see what you're missing ( source ) Scaling it down to your gun safe, it would need anywhere between 1000-2500 lumens of light, depending upon size. A 25W LED bulb provides around 1500 lumens of light. If your safe has multiple shelves, you must use LED light strips of different sizes and brightness to adequately light all areas. The best place to install such light for maximum brightness is usually around the corners or at the border of shelves. A gun safe light must be bright enough to let you identify different items. Quick Take - The Best Gun Safe Lights These are our recommendations for the best gun safe lights: BROWNING - LED Safe Lighting Kit Lockdown® Cordless Light Executive Gun Safe Lighting Kit w/ Motion Switch Review of the Best Gun Safe Lights As the pros and cons of all the possible features of gun safe lights have been evaluated, you will now know what works best in which situation and what doesn’t. Based upon the features, quality, and price of an ideal gun safe light, we have come up with a list of the best gun safe lights on the market. 1. Browning - LED Safe Lighting Kit This LED Safe Lighting kit from Browning is a motion sensing gun safe light. The kit includes six LED light tubes with each tube having six individual LED lights inside. The kit has three flexible connectors to connect each pair of LED light tubes. A motion sensor module can be mounted next to the door or on the ceiling of the safe to properly sense the motion of hands as you work around the safe. The kit is powered by AC and requires your gun safe to have an internal power outlet. You can also use the dehumidifier cable inlet to install a power outlet on the inside of the safe. Buy Now Pros Long-Lasting LED Lights Motion Sensor Included Less Power Consumption Easy to Install and Remove Modular Design to Cover More Area Cons Requires an AC Power Outlet (which can be problematic if you use a dehumidifier, and your safe has only one outlet) Bottom Line The Browning LED light is a simple and economical lighting setup for your gun safe. The sticks have a modular design, and you can use extra connectors and tape to cover up more area. The motion sensor is also a plus, especially at this price point. 2. Lockdown® Cordless Light The Lockdown Cordless Light is a simple solution to light up your safe. These lights are available in two versions of 75 LEDs and 25 LEDs. The 75 version has an on/off switch, whereas the 25 version has a motion sensor. The light can be installed at any position inside the safe using magnets or screws. These lights are powered by three AAA batteries and have a run-time of around six hours. Hence, using rechargeable batteries will be a good idea. The lights can be easily mounted or dismounted and don’t require any sort of wiring or adjustments to be made. If you have a large safe, you can purchase multiple lights for each corner, or even each shelf. The light itself is very affordable and has a long lifespan since it utilizes an LED. Buy Now Pros Inexpensive Longer Lifespan Easy and Quick to Install Motion Sensor Option Available Cons Consumes Battery Power Fast Multiple Lights Required for Proper Illumination Bottom Line "The Lockdown Cordless" Light is an inexpensive and smart solution to light up your safe. These lights can not only be used inside safes, but also for other places such as closets, storerooms, or any other dark corners. Your imagination is the limit. However, it consumes the batteries very quickly so you’ll have to change them every now and then if you use your safe very often. 3. Executive Gun Safe Lighting Kit w/Motion Switch Check out this gun safe lighting kit if you are looking for a brighter alternative to light up your safe. This Executive Gun Safe kit includes five tubes, each filled with LED strips containing 15 LED lights each. Overall, this setup delivers an illumination of approximately 2250 lumens, which is enough to light up the largest gun safes on the market with bright light. The tubular design of the lights allows you to adjust the beam angle. These lights can be mounted at any position inside the gun safe, whether carpeted or not. The included velcro and adhesive based backings allow you to mount the lights with ease. Each tube has six inches of connecting cable on each end, which allows you to install the lights at a distance and around the corners. The lighting kit also has a motion switch which also turns the lights off after ten seconds of inactivity. Considering its price and features, this is a great option for lighting even larger safes. Buy Now Pros Motion Switch Long Extensions on Both Sides Bright 2250 Lumens Illumination Can be Mounted on Any Solid Surface Cons A Bit Overpriced Bottom Line This gun safe light kit offers a plethora of good features. The product is made in the USA, and the manufacturer offers fire and theft replacement and a lifetime replacement warranty. So it’s a complete win-win. 4. TORCHSTAR LED Safe Lighting Kit The Torchstar LED Safe Lighting Kit is by far the most inexpensive and feature-packed product on this list. The kit includes four 12-inch light bars which can be connected to each other via 12-inch long extension cables. Thus helping you reach every corner of the gun safe. The lights are powered by a 12V AC adapter, which draws power from an outlet inside of your safe. Each of these tubes emits a light of 150 lumens each, which is bright enough to light up even a large safe. The kit also includes a motion sensor which is quite sensitive and can detect movement from up to a distance of 26 feet, plus it turns off after four minutes of inactivity. The lights can be mounted inside the safe using adhesive tapes or screws through mounting holes. Buy Now Pros Inexpensive Super Bright Light Long Extension Cables Sensitive Motion Device Multiple Mounting Options Cons Short Lifespan Bottom Line This LED gun safe light is bright, easy to install, and inexpensive. The kit is packed with features, especially at such a low price. The motion sensor is incredible and the long extension cables make installation even easier. 5. "Gun Safe Lighting" With PIR Motion Sensor This safe light is a compact single unit comprised of two LED lights covered by lenses to project light for optimum brightness. The light works upon the concept of motion sensing, where a PIR-based motion sensor detects movements to turn the light on or off. Both LED lights can be rotated and adjusted for the point of focus. The light can be affixed to the gun safe using an adhesive backing. It runs on three AAA batteries and is bright enough to light up a mid-sized safe properly. Considering its price and function, this motion sensor light is a good deal for the money. Buy Now Pros Adjustable Lights PIR Motion Sensor Optimum Brightness Easy Single Step Installation Affordable Enough to Buy Multiple Units Cons Battery Operated Bottom Line This PIR Motion Sensor light is a good choice to light up your safe as it is compact, easy to mount, and bright. The price is low enough to let you buy multiple units without burning a hole in your pocket. A simple kit to use with gun safes, closets, cabinets, counters, dashboards, and any other place you might need an extra bit of light. Best Places to Mount Lights in your Safe Mounting lights at the right position in your gun safe is essential. Mounting at the proper position lets you access and use your gun safe with ease, and also cuts down on your costs to procure more lights for the purpose. The best place to mount a gun safe light is on the door panel, preferably on the top or on the sides. You must also angle the light properly to focus the light on the important areas. If you are using setups such as LED strips, you can also mount some strips on the walls of the safe with larger shelves. If your safe doesn’t have a power outlet, do not try to drill a hole to mount AC powered lights, as this will compromise the integrity of your gun safe. Using battery powered lights is a better option for this type of safe. Also, avoid mounting lights on the door or on the floor of the safe as it will solve nothing. Conclusion A gun safe light is essential to use and manage the safe properly, especially if it is a large one. Using LED lights is a better option over bulbs, as LEDs consume less power and have a longer lifespan. Using motion sensors is also a smart option, compared to using switches. You must also evaluate the size and contents of your safe properly, to install the right number of lights with proper brightness. Taking all these things into consideration, you are sure to find a light kit on the above list to meet your gun safe lighting needs.

[Review] Marlin 1895 .45-70 Dark Series vs Originals

[Review] Marlin 1895 .45-70 Dark Series vs Originals

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s If you hear “lever gun” and immediately have a black-and-white flashback to an old John Wayne movie, you’re not alone. John Wayne and Lever-Action, American! Levers are seen as the cowboy rifles of the gun world by an awful lot of people and because that association translates to them believing levers are out-of-date it means people just aren’t shooting them. Here’s the thing… you’re missing out . Lever-actions have uses beyond their steady appearance in Rio Bravo (not that there’s anything wrong with the perpetual use of the big-loop lever John Wayne toted in multiple movies). Marlin Dark Series Lever-Action Rifles 830 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 830 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing To prove it, Marlin Firearms released tactical versions of their levers under the Dark Series. How do they run? Let’s find out. Table of Contents Loading... Lever Love I can’t help it, I have to throw a little lever-action love out there first. As per usual when I wander off into the weeds of gun history, feel free to skip this section. Of course, if you do you’re totally missing out. The lever-action’s roots can be traced back to 1848. No, it wasn’t Winchester that first came up with the idea, it was a company called Volition Repeating Rifle. "Volition Repeating Rifle" They filed the first patent but in the end it bombed because they apparently made the design a lot more complex than it needed to be. After that failure, another company, Robbins & Lawrence, purchased the patent and tried their hand at production – and failed. Finally, Smith and Wesson bought the patent off Robbins & Lawrence and teamed up with some other gun world guys to create the Volcanic Repeating Arms Company. But wait, there’s more. The attempt to design and produce what they called the Volcanic Rifle was yet another failure in the history of the lever-action. Super-duper rare New Haven Arms Volcanic Lever-Action Carbine, sold at RIA for $48,875 In the end, Smith and Wesson bailed – a successful bail, if you think about it – and it was Oliver Winchester left holding the bag. He immediately re-branded the company as the "New Haven Arms" Company and set to work correcting issues with the rifle. That’s how we got the Henry rifle that so many people think was the first lever. It kind of was…but not really. It was just the first truly successful lever gat. Modern Henry .45-70 Lever Action Fast-forward to the 1890s and we have John Marlin developing the Model 1891 and Model 1893, designs that morphed into the Model 39 and Model 36. About 60 years later the Model 36 became the Model 336. The Model 336 is included in the Dark Series; I have one chambered in .30-30 Win that is pretty awesome. Best Entry Level Lever-Action Marlin 336 550 at Cabelas Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 550 at Cabelas Prices accurate at time of writing As for the Model 1895, it came to be in the year of its name as a larger-caliber progression over the Model 1893. For some reason, the 1895 wasn’t a big seller when it first came out but in 1972 when Marlin re-introduced it, the rifle began selling at a brisker pace. The Marlin Firearms Dark Series Model 1895 in .45-70 Gov’t (left) and the "Dark Series Model" 1895 in .30-30 Win (right). Today, with the launch of the Dark Series, Marlin is seeing some seriously solid sales to the point the gun is on backorder. That’s good news for the lever world. Model 1895 Some specifics about the 1895. One of the things that differentiate the Marlin levers from many others is that it ejects to the side rather than to the top. That’s A Good Thing for shooters, especially if you want to drop a scope on your lever-action. In fact, this rifle ships with an XS Lever Rail topped by ghost rings so you can easily put an optic on it. Running Riton optics on the Dark Series Model 1895 in .30-30 Win tightened up groups even more but these are refreshingly accurate guns even running irons. The Dark Series 1895 has a 16.25-inch barrel and an overall length of 34.5-inches, making it a nice size for use as a brush gun and easier to maneuver in a hunting blind (and in general). It has a full-length tubular magazine with a five-round capacity – and if five rounds of .45-70 Gov’t isn’t enough to drop a sounder of hogs I don’t know what is – and an 11/16×24 threaded barrel. Yes, the Dark Series 1895 is suppressor-ready. Be still my heart. Marlin was smart enough to thread the barrels of their Dark Series levers. Suppressor, here I come. Because it’s the aptly-named Dark Series this 1895 is fully blacked-out. The wood stock is painted with black webbing, the metal has a parkerized finish, and the paracord used for the lever and sling is black, too. This is exactly the kind of gun that warms my cold heart. A big loop lever makes the gun easier to run overall but is also helpful if you’re wearing gloves. The lever is also wrapped in black paracord which is a nice for-comfort feature. Pre-paracorded lever? Don’t mind if I do. It has an empty weight of 7.65 pounds so it’s easy enough to tote through the woods. Oh, and it’s chambered in .45-to Gov’t because you shouldn’t mess with a classic and big booms rock. Hornady LEVERevoution .45-70 32 at Lucky Gunner Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 32 at Lucky Gunner Prices accurate at time of writing Range Time At the range I ran a few different brands of ammo through the "Dark Series 1895" . The Remington Core-Lokt .45-70 Gov’t 405 grain SP and Barnes VOR-TX .45-70 Gov’t 300 grain TSX FN was a given because this is, after all, a Marlin. Hornady LEVERevolution .45-70 Gov’t 325 grain FTX are another must-have for levers and are, in fact, seriously badass rounds for hunting. My first observation from the Dark Series 1895 was something I already knew better than doing: if you run 100 rounds of 45-70 Gov’t through a lever without stopping, your shoulder is going to have a bad time. It was worth it, but I felt it. The Remington and Barnes ammo produced what I’d label negligible recoil considering the caliber. It was there but it wasn’t massive. Using the included irons and shooting from the bench the rifle nailed five-shot groups under 1.5-inches at 25 yards and hovered around 3.1-inches at 50 yards. Using Remington Core-Lokts and iron sights the Marlin Dark Series 1895 nailed some wickedly precise groups. I got carried away and added five more shots to a group at 25 yards and maintained the same lovely one-hole group. Considering the state of my vision and my expectations when I started, you could say I was pleased. That Hornady LEVERevolution, though…you feel that one in your bones. It also has an edge for precision, so it’s a load you should seriously consider for hunting. Hornady Lever Revolution .45-70 vs 5.56 Doing the same irons-and-bench-shooting routine, five-shot groups with Hornady ammo were around 1.2-inches at 25 yards and I had a best five-shot group of 2.7-inches at 50 yards. The rifle far outdid what I anticipated. With an optic, groups are even smaller. The fact that the rifle consistently produced tight groups with irons made my day. A brief commentary on the performance of various features. The trigger on the Marlin Dark Series 1895 has an abbreviated, even pull with a crisp, clean break. Reset is quite short. "The Marlin Firearms" Dark Series Model 1895 chambered in .45-70 Gov’t. The lever is a bit stiff and requires more force than I’d like but based on comparing it to my older Model 1895 I’m guessing it will smooth out with use. Until the lever smooths out, rapid-fire is more challenging to manage but not entirely impossible. So far, so good. "The Dark Series" 1895 has eaten everything I’ve fed it, created stellar groups on paper, and been awesome to shoot. Length of pull is a little shorter than I’d like but not short enough to cause trouble. The rubber pad on the stock does help mitigate felt recoil to your shoulder somewhat but mostly you’ll notice felt recoil changes significantly depending on the ammunition you use. Flashback to the Originals It’s worth mentioning this isn’t my only 1895; I have three . Each rifle I have is from a different generation of the 1895 design and I admit the oldest gun is my favorite. That’s partly due to long use smoothing out the lever and the fact that I do actually enjoy the golden appearance of unpainted wood stocks. From past experience, I know the Marlin 1895 is a solid gun for everything from deer to gators to hogs (yes, gators). Here’s the thing. The Dark Series 1895 really does seem to have an edge for accuracy. It’s definitely more precise, which is interesting. When comparing them side by side you can see different screws were used in the receiver of the Dark than in the older 1895s. The rail and ghost ring sights on the Dark are another obvious improvement over the older design. And although the lever itself is stiffer on the dark the bolt runs more smoothly than the older 1895 bolts. The bolt of the Dark Series Model 1895 has a parkerized finish. The Winner There isn’t exactly a clear winner among the various Model 1895s. If you an edge in precision, get the Dark Series 1895. The fact that it’s blacked out is a major plus, too (just saying). But if you want to go the more traditional route with light-colored wood and irons, go for an older Model 1895. I haven’t had any failures with any of my Model 1895s. Not saying it cannot happen, because it can, just that it’s gone quite well for years. A little side-by-side look at an older Marlin Model 1895 in .45-70 Gov’t and the new Dark Series version. Aside from aesthetics and a precision bump there are other reasons to consider the Dark Series 1895 over the other versions. The biggest reason is the rail because it means you can mount a scope to the rifle without messing with aftermarket rails. I don’t know about you, but that’s an extremely big pro for me. Although I was able to shoot the Dark Series 1895 well with irons it’s even better with a scope and if you’re using it for hunting you might really want the boost of a good optic. And if you really love irons, even the ghost ring sights are better than the aperture sights found on the older models. The change to XS ghost rings atop the Dark Series’ XS Lever Rail is a great improvement over the older-Model 1895 irons. Then there’s the cushion the paracord-wrapped lever provides and the bonus of an included paracord sling. Sure, you could paracord All the Things yourself but it’s nice when it’s done for you and matches the finish so well. It’s a complete package and it runs well out of the box. I call that a win. By the Numbers Reliability: 5/5 There have been no issues, yet, with any of my 1895s. I will say you need to know how to work the lever fully because if you do not cycle it properly you’ll cause a failure. Make sure you open and close it entirely. Ergonomics: 4/5 This rifle has decent overall ergonomics. Minus one point for the shorter length of pull but honestly, is there such a thing as the perfect length fixed-stock rifle? No. No there is not. The rubber pad on the stock functions nicely to reduce felt recoil and the gun fits my hands well. Accuracy: 5/5 I almost can’t believe I’m giving a lever gun a 5/5 for accuracy but here we are. The Dark Series 1895 is an accurate gun – dare I say, precise – and out-performs a lot of other levers currently on the market. You won’t be disappointed. Customization: 3/5 The things I’d normally do as aftermarket additions to a lever – a sling, rail, and wrapping the lever – are already done. You could change up the color, but why would you? Same goes for the trigger. It’s good to go. So although you could customize this gun if you set your mind to it I’m not really seeing reasons to mess with it. Value: 4/5 With an MSRP of $949 you’re going to find the Dark Series 1895 at dealers for sub-$849, maybe even less as time goes on. It isn’t a smoking deal but it is a reasonable value for the gun. "Marlin Dark Series" Lever-Action Rifles 830 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 830 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing Overall: 5/5 Parting Shots What can I say, it’s a rocking rifle. I do want to see it withstand the test of time and hard use but it’s off to a good start. Then there’s that iron-sights-assisted precision. And it’s black. All black. The Marlin Dark Series Model in .45-70 Gov’t is a nice gateway lever for firearms lovers who haven’t tried lever-actions yet and also makes a nice addition to existing collections. I recommend this one for both hunters and guys who just want to go plinking with a good lever gun. Just be prepared. This is not your AR-15’s felt recoil. What is your favorite classic rifle? Do you like lever-actions or bolt-actions better for deer season? Let us know in the comments! If you want to really scratch that cowboy itch, take a look at the Cimarron-Pietta 1873 !

First Time Gun Owner Standards

First Time Gun Owner Standards

At the beginning of this coronavirus pandemic, people started to freak out and guns started flying off the shelf. We have an influx of new gun owners from disaster… and to add fuel to the fire, with these nationwide riots going on and people realizing that the police won’t always be able to help you… as the old saying goes, “ when seconds count, police are only minutes away .” More and more people are buying guns at a record pace to be able to defend themselves and their families. With all of this new blood, I wanted to make an article with advice that I have for new gun owners and to go over the safety rules of firearms. If your an experienced shooter, this is all bread and butter, but if you know someone about to purchase or has recently purchased their first defensive firearm, send this article to them. A first-time gun-owning Sir: ” Excuse me, what is your best disaster pricing?” A gun salesman, hiding a grin: “That will be $3500 sir, cash or check?” General Advice: You are making a very important purchase if you haven’t made it already. You are most likely making a purchase that your life and your family’s lives could count on one day. While 99.9% of your life, you will never have to use a gun, that 0.1% time that you have to use your gun for self-defense could be  100% of your life. So do your research and make sure that the gun you get is reliable. Don’t just go out and buy the cheapest one you can get, save up and buy a reputable gun, do your research. Don’t just get a gun and think you’re safe, you need to train!! I get very irritated when someone owns a gun and doesn’t shoot it at all or often enough, especially with handguns. Handgun shooting is a very perishable skill and if you don’t shoot enough, you will lose the ability to shoot well. Pair that with the stress of being in a home defense situation, you will miss your shot. If you have purchased a rifle, make sure it’s sighted in. Having a rifle, or a gun that’s not sighted in, is just irresponsible. Now that that rant is over, most importantly… have fun! If you don’t have fun shooting, you won’t shoot, and if you don’t shoot, you won’t be a proficient shooter. Shooting is exhilarating! You are very literally holding a controlled explosion in your hands within arm’s length of your face. It gets really fun if you get into long-range shooting. Once you get to about 300 yards and more so 400 yards, you will see the steel target move before you hear the sound of the bullet hitting the steel. It makes me smile every time! And if shooting fast is your thing, that can also be a lot of fun. Especially if you get into competitions, you can meet a lot of cool people and have a good time doing it. Also, something that I learned the hard way, is never to make an impulse decision. I had a nice Bravo Company upper and because I wanted a free float rail instead of a massive quad rail, I sold the upper and bought a PSA upper instead, not that PSA isn’t good, but BCM back then was the gold standard. Knowing what I know now, I could have made it a free float rifle with the handguard I want in 30 minutes or less. Don’t just buy something because it’s the latest and greatest, let it prove itself. I sold that complete BCM upper for $300. I took a $300 loss on it just to have what I wanted. Wasn’t worth it. Some other general advice I give to people is to own a few extra magazines. You don’t have to go all out and have 7 or 8 or 20 mags but have at least 3 or 4. Magazines should be considered disposable. You won’t be picking up magazines during a self-defense situation. For rifle purchasers, MLOK is the way to go for a handguard, not keymod. MLOK is proven to be more durable and consistent, as well as the army is moving to it and less stuff is being made for keymod. If you can get a free-float keymod handguard on a good deal, it will work just fine, but more and more stuff is being made for MLOK, not keymod. For those of you that don’t know, MLOK, Keymod, and Picatinny rails are how you mount accessories to your rifle. Dry fire is a great way to practice the fundamentals of shooting without costing you anything. I am a much better shooter when I dry fire more often. To dry fire, you do break some of the safety rules so you have to be extra careful to have absolutely no ammo in the same room. Dry firing has made me a much better shooter fundamentally and has helped me get better at different shooting positions. Do it once a week, focus on the front sight alignment and trigger control. You won’t ever be fast if you don’t get fast. Compete. Finally, competitions are a great way to test your skills. You may think you are a good shooter when shooting on your own or with some friends, but once you go to a competition and have a timer and are competing against other people… your mechanics seem to disappear and you all of a sudden forget how to do a reload. Competition is a great way to see your weaknesses come through and see what you need to work on. If you don’t want to do a competition, get a timer, and start timing yourself, you would be amazed at the stress you put on yourself to go faster when you are being timed. USPSA competition finder can be accessed here. It’s worth the drive of an hour or two to attend a match. (EDITOR: Don’t psych yourself out. Come willing to learn, and let them know it’s your first time. They will squad you with their best teachers and other new shooters, GURUNTEED) Safety Rules: As long as you follow the safety rules, you will be fine handling guns minus some sort of catastrophic failure. Treat every gun as if it were loaded. Never point your gun at anything you aren’t willing to destroy Keep your finger off the trigger until you are aiming at your target Know your target and what is beyond it And my personal rule is physically to check the chamber when unloading your gun. I have pulled the charging handle on an SKS before, thought the gun was empty, followed rule number 2 in case the gun went off and aimed into the hillside across my creek, and pulled the trigger, nothing happened, pulled the charging handle again and out comes a live round with a light primer strike. I got lucky and was a ghost for about 30 minutes before I touched the gun again. So check the chamber . But the other 4 rules are the universal gun safety rules. As long as you treat every gun as if it were loaded, not aim it at your friends or animals thinking it’s funny, keep your finger off the trigger so you don’t accidentally pull it in case your gun is loaded, and don’t shoot off into the abyss, you will be fine. The first three rules are pretty straight forward, the fourth one, not so much Rule number 4, know your target and what is beyond it. What this means is that if you put a cardboard target up on flat land and shoot it, the bullet doesn’t just stop, it keeps going. Shooting into a hillside, burm, ground, etc. stops the bullet from traveling further than you intended it. This also translates to self-defense uses. The bullet will possibly go through your intended target, or miss, go through your wall, your neighbor’s wall, and hopefully not hit your neighbor, so it’s important to have good self-defense ammo to help with this for home defense situations. Identify no-shoot lanes in your own home to minimize the risk of hitting something behind a thin barrier (drywall). First Attachments for your Firearm: There are many things you will want to put on your gun, most likely before you even start shooting you will have an idea of what you want your gun to look like. It can look like whatever you want it to, but these are the things you should have first. A light A light source is number one because you can’t shoot what you can’t see. This is also only for any gun that MIGHT have the possibility of being used in a home defense situation. If it’s a competition gun for your first gun, that’s a different story, but we are focusing on practical gun uses, so home defense equals you NEED a light. You need to KNOW your target can’t do that in the dark without a light. Nothing would ruin your day more than shooting a family member because you couldn’t identify them. Good luck in prison too. 2. Sight/optic I will be doing an article on LPVO vs Red dot eventually, but for this, you need a way to aim your gun. So that means either iron sights, an LPVO, or a red dot. Irons are fine if that’s what came with your gun and you can only get a light or a red dot, get the light and stick with irons . Irons are very easy to use especially at close distances. However, if you want to upgrade to a nicer sight like a red dot or LPVO, get a red dot sight . Mainly because they have a better price to performance ratio. You can get a good, dependable red dot for $250 or less very easily. An LPVO you are looking at upwards of $400-$500 starting. Red dots have an easier learning curve and are very reliable at a much lower price point, which is why I recommend red dots to new shooters for home defense. You can use an LPVO for home defense, but you need a little more training than a stupid simple RDS. 3. A sling A sling is a personal preference. Some may want them on a home defense gun in case the burglar gets too close and tries to overpower you and take your gun. Some may want it if you have a kid or a dog in one hand, or even if you get injured in one arm, you can use your sling as extra support. You may not want a sling because in the middle of the night it might get in the way. It could cause a malfunction for us lefties or you might just fumble with it and have it slow you down. It’s a personal preference but if you have this gun also for a bug out/boogaloo/shtf/ whatever else you want to call it, you will need a sling to carry your rifle around. Also, in case you haven’t figured it out, slings are only for rifles, not for handguns. Handguns, however… do need a good holster. Form fitted Kydex is best. Skip the nylon Uncle Mikes. Trust me. Final thoughts The biggest thing about having a gun is that it is a big responsibility. While it’s a big responsibility, it can also be a LOT of fun! When it comes to being serious, make sure you have a light on your self-defense firearm and don’t impulse buy things… try to do some research if time allows it. Don’t go into a gun store relying on the guy behind the counter to suggest the perfect gun for you. Know what you need before you go in, there are too many gun store workers that give out bad information and recommend their favorite gun, which might not be what you need. Share: Google Twitter Facebook Pinterest Reddit More Tumblr LinkedIn Pocket Email Print

10 Best Tactical Pants 2020

10 Best Tactical Pants 2020

Tactical pants are not your typical everyday cargo pants , despite their similar appearance. Tougher and more durable with hidden pockets and reinforced knees, tactical pants may be the most versatile piece of clothing you can own. They have long been a favorite of the military, recreational shooters, outdoor enthusiasts, law enforcement, and first responders as well as hikers and rock climbers. If you are trying to find the best tactical pants to wear both on and off the job, this informational guide will help lead you to the right pair. Care and Maintenance Tips Never underestimate the importance of care instructions. Tactical pants aren’t your typical everyday pants, and each pair comes with its own set of special care instructions. To ensure your tactical pants last, be sure to adhere to the instructions provided. While care and maintenance of your tactical pants won’t be particularly unusual, it may be slightly more complicated than tossing them in the washer with your regular clothing. Top 10 Tactical Pants Comparison Table Picture Name Number of Pockets Price Rating (1-5) Picture Name Number of Pockets Price Rating (1-5) 1. 5.11 Tactical Stryke Pant With Flex-Tac TM 12 $$$ 4.7 2. TRU-SPEC Men's Lightweight 24-7 Pant 14 $$ 4.7 3. Helikon-Tex Outback Line, OTP Outdoor Tactical Pants Nylon Spandex 10 $$$$ 4.7 4. 5.11 Men's Tactical 74273 TacLite Pro Pant 8 $$ 4.6 5. Helikon Men's CPU Trousers Polycotton Ripstop Flecktarn 10 $$$ 4.6 6. BLACKHAWK! Men's Lightweight Tactical Pants 8 $$$ 4.5 7. Propper "Lightweight Tactical Pants" - Dark Gray - 38 x 36 9 $$ 4.5 8. Under Armour Men's Storm Tactical Patrol Pants 9 $$$ 4.5 9. Woolrich Elite Lightweight Tactical - 44441-BK-3430 8 $ 4.5 10. CQR Men's Tactical Pants Lightweight EDC Assault Cargo TLP103/104/105 8 $ 4.5 Finding the Most Suitable Tactical Pants for You With so many choices available, finding a great pair of tactical pants isn’t as easy as buying regular ordinary pants. There are many factors to consider, including price, comfort, style, and durability. Here is some information to help you narrow down your options. Price. Expect comfortable and reliable tactical pants to fall in the mid to high price range. Less expensive pants are typically less durable and lack essential features. Durability. Tactical pants are designed to hold up to heavy use. Even less expensive brands will be stain and tear resistant and much more durable than the average pair of pants. However, look for tactical pants that can endure repeated rugged use over time. Look for products with reinforced seams, pockets, belt loops, and knee areas. Many brands stand behind the durability of their product with extended warranties. Material. The material used in construction will influence durability and comfort. Most tactical pants use a blend of cotton and polyester; this provides excellent breathability as well as sturdiness. Pants made of synthetic materials are durable but lack comfort and breathability. Some tactical pants are treated with stain-resistant or waterproof coatings, such as Teflon. These chemical treatments can make tactical pants less comfortable, especially in hot, humid weather. Style. While there isn’t much variation on style when it comes to tactical pants, some blend in better with everyday wear. Color. Today’s tactical pants come in almost every color of the rainbow and even several patterns of camouflage. However, black and khaki remain the most popular colors. Top 3 Best Tactical Pants Reviews 1. 5.11 "Tactical Stryke Pant" With Flex-Tac Stretchable, lightweight, and durable, 5.11’s Tactical Stryke Pant offers exceptional comfort and performance both on and off the job. With triple-reinforced seams and extensive bar tacking at key stress points, these tactical pants are built to last, no matter what your professional or recreational pursuits. Teflon treated to protect against stains, spills, and dirt and constructed of a cotton-polyester blend of ripstop fabric, these pants will keep you looking sharp even in harsh conditions. The gusseted crotch, tunnel waistband, and articulated knees offer a full range of motion, and you will feel comfortable and stylish whether upland hunting or sipping drinks in a casual business setting. The twelve smart pockets, including double deep cargo pockets, provide enough space for all your everyday tactical items. With this level of durability, comfort, and utility, you’ll agree these are hands down the best tactical pants on the market today. 2. TRU-SPEC Men’s Lightweight 24-7 Pant Constructed of lightweight, 6.5-ounce cotton polyester ripstop Teflon-coated fabric, these durable, quick-drying, wind resistant tactical pants are perfect for everyday wear. They are wrinkle resistant and easy to care for and are rugged and comfortable enough for both tactical and practical wear. There is plenty of room in the pockets, legs, seat, and crotch. These pants offer a perfect fit for almost every body type and size. The reinforced knees feature inside openings for the easy addition of comfort knee pads; this makes these pants perfect for EMTs and first responders. Also a smart option for hikers and outdoor adventurers, these TRU-SPEC Lightweight 24-7 pants are moisture repellant, stain resistant, and offer enough pockets to carry an array of essential gear. Light, cool, and surprisingly breathable, these pants work for indoor and outdoor use. 3. Helikon- "Tex Outback Line" Tactical Pants Made from nylon and spandex coated with a Dupont Teflon coating, these tactical pants have a unique patented design. The comfortable design features a slim look while offering an increased range of motion without stressing any seams. Pockets are arranged for quick and easy access and allow you to carry all your essential equipment in an organized way without sacrificing tactical advantage. The lightweight, breathable material wicks moisture away from the body while resisting outside water, stains, and spills. Stretchable and comfortable, this fabric is a smart choice for outdoor activities no matter what Mother Nature has in store. These pants have everything: fit, style, function, durability, and function. With a price tag that matches the quality, these tactical pants may be cost-prohibitive to the budget conscious consumer, but they are worth every penny.

Reloading Ammo: Smokeless Powder Temperature Sensitivity

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379d88e397a_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379d88e397a_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } Whether boiling hot or icy cold, temperature has an effect on a cartridge's pressure. Though, less so today through advances in modern smokeless powder. Pressure spikes and drops due to temperature have long been a bane of a reloader's existence. However, advancements in propellants have mitigated the variable of smokeless powder temperature sensitivity, in many respects. To understand smokeless powder temperature sensitivity, a look back at cartridge history and development is in order. In the early days of the 20th century, when cordite was the propellant du jour, the reputation of cartridges was made and/or broken based on their performance in the heat of the tropics. You see, the firearms were regulated and pressure tested in the relatively cool climate of England and Europe, and were then carried off by brave sportsmen into the brutal heat of India and Africa. In that heat, the pressures spiked and extraction of cases became difficult, if not impossible. The cordite was the culprit, as the chemical compound was extremely sensitive to fluctuations on temperature. Related GunDigest Articles Reloading: Temperature Sensitive Powder? Reloading Ammo: Keeping Your Powder Scale and Thrower on Solid Footing Reloading Ammo: Pitfalls of Using Old Pistol Reloading Data The answer to the problem, at least temporarily, resulted in some of our most famous cartridge cases. The .416 Rigby, for example, was made with an oversized case to keep the pressures low when loaded with cordite. Those low pressures, and the ease and reliability of extraction, bestowed the solid reputation that the .416 Rigby had earned even before being launched into super stardom by Robert Ruark. Modern smokeless powders solved much of that problem, giving not only a boost in attainable velocities, but a much more stable platform, however there is still a certain level of smokeless powder temperature sensitivity that rears its ugly head. The usual accepted value was a 1 fps gain or loss per degree Fahrenheit of deviation from 68-degrees. So, if you were to measure your velocity of say, 3,000 fps at 68-degrees, and were to retest, you could expect 3,012 fps at 80-degrees when chasing African plains game, and 2,950 fps at 18-degrees when hunting deer in Canada.

The 4 Best ACOG’s for SCAR 17 Rifles – Reviews 2020 Photo by Program Executive Office Soldier / CC BY So why get an ACOG for SCAR 17’s? Well, I’m a little biased when it comes to rifle optics. If you ever ask me, “should I get an ACOG or a . . . ”, I will immediately say ACOG. I used an ACOG for five years as a Marine, and in combat. It’s the greatest combat rifle optic on the market period. If you are rocking a SCAR 17 you are likely tempted to toss an ACOG on top. The SCAR 17 is a long range rifle that’s still useful for close quarters combat due to its lightweight and semi-automatic nature. Choosing an ACOG for the SCAR 17 means you have to research a model that’s designed for the .308/7.62 NATO round. Luckily, Trijicon offers you multiple options for different roles your SCAR could occupy, and we’ve gathered some of the best. But first, a quick reminder: Bindon Aiming Concept You’ll hear me mention this several times. This concept was invented by the founder of Trijicon, Glyn Bindon. It’s a two eyes open shooting style that is designed for magnified optics at close range. With the dominant eye looking through the optic and the non-dominant eye open, the optic basically becomes a red dot. This makes a magnified optic a dual purpose device. This can be used with some but not all ACOGs. Now, with that out of the way . . . Here are our recommendations for the 4 best ACOG’s for SCAR 17 rifles on the market: The Traditional ACOG for SCAR 17 Trijicon TA11E-G ACOG 3.5x35mm Dual Illuminatedx 40mm, Green Chevron BAC .308 Flattop Reticle with TA51 Mount, Black Price: Price as of 08/14/2020 03:25 PDT (more info) Product prices and availability are accurate as of the date/time indicated and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on Amazon.com at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product. This ACOG is the traditional all around money maker. It’s traditional as both an optic and in an ACOG type of way. This 3.5 power fixed power optic is designed for short to medium range and can utilize the Bindon aiming concept for extreme close quarters. It utilizes a battery-free design that makes use of tritium and fiber optics to create a solar powered red reticle. This reticle is incredibly bright, and if it’s too bright, a layer of tape over the tritium and fiber optics will work wonders. The reticle is designed to adjust its brightness level as the ambient light changes ( see full specs ). The crosshair design is interesting and dynamic for the SCAR 17’s. It provides a traditional reticle most of us are used to, meaning there is less time required to learn the reticle. It still features Trijicon’s famed bullet drop compensator that’s designed around the .308 caliber round the SCAR 17 fires. This allows shooters to reach out to 1200 yards with relative ease. This system is proven and reliable with the United States military and is responsible for the increased accuracy our troops had during the War on Terror. The Trijicon ACOG 3.5 x 35 provides a very clear view and Trijicon only uses the highest quality glass in their scopes. The ACOG is a superbly powerful and rugged optic that is designed to hold up to the rigors of warfare, and with this scope, you’ve likely found the best ACOG for SCAR 17. Trijicon 3.5 x 35 LED ACOG Watch this video on YouTube

Summary

If you possess a large gun safe, you’ll probably know the importance of putting lights into it. A properly illuminated gun safe is not only easy to use but can also mean the difference between success and failure in an emergency situation. Here, we will discuss the importance of installing lights in your gun safe and the aspects you must consider for it to be done properly.